Week nine of my stupidity

Week nine of my stupidity

Remember two weeks ago when I took "improvement" photographs and wasn't very happy? That didn't happen this week.  This week, I was thrilled.  The difference in the before and after images is incredible.  The Weekend As always, Phil's instructions for the weekend are to "be active."   I've taken to trying to be active by walking places when I would normally drive (although this is more out of concern for my car's dislike of short journeys) but it does feel better to have walked more. We have a lovely little nature walk in Portree, with offshoots leading in multiple different directions.  One of them takes me very close to the Fingal Centre (which my phone loves to autocorrect as "the Fungal Centre" - yuck!) where I play badminton on Mondays.   Day Forty-Four After my badminton lesson on Thursday, I wrote down notes of everything I needed to do - but I dreamed I forgot it all and stood there like a statue.   Fortunately, this was not the case on Monday night.  The lesson really helped and I was able to return shots I couldn't have reached before!   Day Forty-Five Seeing my progress really motivates me to keep going - and my lower body workout was actually quite enjoyable today.   Day Forty-Six Everything fell by the wayside today. I'd had a slight sore throat yesterday afternoon but, by today, I was being sick every half hour and running a very high temperature.  I'm afraid I chickened out of my exercises. Day Forty-Seven After a three-hour afternoon nap, I felt slightly better and actually managed to eat something.  Still no exercises, not even my bike. Day Forty-Eight I'm never quite sure how hard to push myself, whether I'm just being lazy or genuinely need a break.  I'm going to aim for at least ten minutes on my bike today and see how I get on.  I just hope I haven't lost any progress. Remember two weeks ago when I took "improvement" photographs and wasn't very happy? That didn't happen this week.  This week, I was thrilled.  The difference in the before and after images is incredible.  The Weekend As always, Phil's instructions for the weekend are to "be active."   I've taken to trying to be active by walking places when I would normally drive (although this is more out of concern for my car's dislike of short journeys) but it does feel better to have walked more. We have a lovely little nature walk in Portree, with offshoots leading in multiple different directions.  One of them takes me very close to the Fingal Centre (which my phone loves to autocorrect as "the Fungal Centre" - yuck!) where I play badminton on Mondays.   Day Forty-Four After my badminton lesson on Thursday, I wrote down notes of everything I needed to do - but I dreamed I forgot it all and stood there like a statue.   Fortunately, this was not the case on Monday night.  The lesson really helped and I was able to return shots I couldn't have reached before!   Day Forty-Five Seeing my progress really motivates me to keep going - and my lower body workout was actually quite enjoyable today.   Day Forty-Six Everything fell by the wayside today. I'd had a slight sore throat yesterday afternoon but, by today, I was being sick every half hour and running a very high temperature.  I'm afraid I chickened out of my exercises. Day Forty-Seven After a three-hour afternoon nap, I felt slightly better and actually managed to eat something.  Still no exercises, not even my bike. Day Forty-Eight I'm never quite sure how hard to push myself, whether I'm just being lazy or genuinely need a break.  I'm going to aim for at least ten minutes on my bike today and see how I get on.  I just hope I haven't lost any progress. "Missing workouts in the short-term won't make a huge difference.  It can't be helped if you're unwell.  And you can't make up for it.  The best thing to do is get back to the plan once you are better.  So no need to be anxious." Not my words of wisdom.  Phil Agostino's.   It always seems to feel like you're getting there and then some unexpected event happens and you go right back to where you started.  I'm still not 100% better from whatever was wrong with me.  My throat doesn't feel right and I tire out very easily.  But I'm hoping this week I can get back into my normal routine and keep up the progress.  The Weekend I wasn't particularly active this weekend, with only a few gentle walks and 20 minutes on my exercise bike. Day Fifty-One After my badminton lesson on Thursday, I wrote down notes of everything I needed to do - but I dreamed I forgot it all and stood there like a statue.   Fortunately, this was not the case on Monday night.  The lesson really helped and I was able to return shots I couldn't have reached before!   Day Fifty-Two Seeing my progress really motivates me to keep going - and my lower body workout was actually quite enjoyable today.   Day Fifty-Three Everything fell by the wayside today. I'd had a slight sore throat yesterday afternoon but, by today, I was being sick every half hour and running a very high temperature.  I'm afraid I chickened out of my exercises. Day Fifty-Four After a three-hour afternoon nap, I felt slightly better and actually managed to eat something.  Still no exercises, not even my bike. Day Fifty-Five I'm never quite sure how hard to push myself, whether I'm just being lazy or genuinely need a break.  I'm going to aim for at least ten minutes on my bike today and see how I get on.  I just hope I haven't lost any progress. "Missing workouts in the short-term won't make a huge difference.  It can't be helped if you're unwell.  And you can't make up for it.  The best thing to do is get back to the plan once you are better.  So no need to be anxious." Not my words of wisdom.  Phil Agostino's.   It always seems to feel like you're getting there and then some unexpected event happens and you go right back to where you started.  I'm still not 100% better from whatever was wrong with me.  My throat doesn't feel right and I tire out very easily.  But I'm hoping this week I can get back into my normal routine and keep up the progress.  The Weekend I wasn't particularly active this weekend, with only a few gentle walks and 20 minutes on my exercise bike. Day Fifty-One The air conditioning appears to be broken at the sports centre, where I play badminton every Monday.  It felt like I was playing badminton in the middle of a scirocco.  I'm usually a cold person, but the heat was almost unbearable and I felt like I was going to faint at one point.  We all powered through, though.  Day Fifty-Two I dragged myself through my lower body workout.  I'm still not 100% and tire very easily.   Day Fifty-Three Everything fell by the wayside today. I'd had a slight sore throat yesterday afternoon but, by today, I was being sick every half hour and running a very high temperature.  I'm afraid I chickened out of my exercises. Day Fifty-Four After a three-hour afternoon nap, I felt slightly better and actually managed to eat something.  Still no exercises, not even my bike. Day Fifty-Five I'm never quite sure how hard to push myself, whether I'm just being lazy or genuinely need a break.  I'm going to aim for at least ten minutes on my bike today and see how I get on.  I just hope I haven't lost any progress. "Missing workouts in the short-term won't make a huge difference.  It can't be helped if you're unwell.  And you can't make up for it.  The best thing to do is get back to the plan once you are better.  So no need to be anxious." Not my words of wisdom.  Phil Agostino's.   It always seems to feel like you're getting there and then some unexpected event happens and you go right back to where you started.  I'm still not 100% better from whatever was wrong with me.  My throat doesn't feel right and I tire out very easily.  But I'm hoping this week I can get back into my normal routine and keep up the progress.  The Weekend I wasn't particularly active this weekend, with only a few gentle walks and 20 minutes on my exercise bike. Day Fifty-One The air conditioning appears to be broken at the sports centre, where I play badminton every Monday.  It felt like I was playing badminton in the middle of a scirocco.  I'm usually a cold person, but the heat was almost unbearable and I felt like I was going to faint at one point.  We all powered through, though.  Day Fifty-Two I dragged myself through my lower body workout.  I'm still not 100% and tire very easily.   Day Fifty-Three I took a day off work today, but ended up having a rather emotional day.  Tired, not feeling very well and with a deep sadness, I decided not to do my workout. Later in the evening, I changed my mind and took Phil's advice to just do a little bit and see where I ended up.  I didn't finish the entire workout, but I did so much more than if I'd just taken the evening off.   Day Fifty-Four After a three-hour afternoon nap, I felt slightly better and actually managed to eat something.  Still no exercises, not even my bike. Day Fifty-Five I'm never quite sure how hard to push myself, whether I'm just being lazy or genuinely need a break.  I'm going to aim for at least ten minutes on my bike today and see how I get on.  I just hope I haven't lost any progress.
Cruising in the world's last working paddle steamer

Cruising in the world's last working paddle steamer

sdsdsd sdsdssd When I was much younger, my Grandma treated me, my mum and herself to a cruise aboard the Waverley, the Clyde-built paddle steamer and the last seagoing vessel of her kind. I can't remember how old I was, or very much about the trip.  I do remember that I wanted to wear a bodywarmer because I thought it looked nautical and couldn't find it anywhere in my room.   And I remember the engine room vividly - it seemed enormous to such a small child and the constant thump and rhythm of the incredible mechanisms were hypnotic. Because my Grandma lived in Glasgow, I didn't see her as often as I would have liked so days out like this were very special - and the Waverley always conjured up fond memories for me. So I was keen to see her return to service after a four-year-long absence, during which extensive work was done to make her seaworthy.   Sadly, my Grandma died last year and was unable to accompany me.   Skye is home to many boat tours, many of which are aimed at tourists and visitors.  The Waverley felt a little bit different.   Most of the people I spoke to were Scottish.  Many of them had friends or knew people who had worked on or even helped build her.  All of us felt connected with a shared love of the vessel, her incredible history and our own heritage.   I was struck by the idea that generations could enjoy her - grandparents, grandchildren and then the grandchildren's grandchildren!   I wanted to include my grandmother somehow, so I photographed a photograph.  Sadly, I didn't have any pictures to hand of the trip we all took on the Wavelery (and how I wished I'd taken more photographs!) but I had a lovely one of both my grandparents together, with the incredible engine room forming the backdrop. When I was much younger, my Grandma treated me, my mum and herself to a cruise aboard the Waverley, the Clyde-built paddle steamer and the last seagoing vessel of her kind. I can't remember how old I was, or very much about the trip.  I do remember that I wanted to wear a bodywarmer because I thought it looked nautical and couldn't find it anywhere in my room.   And I remember the engine room vividly - it seemed enormous to such a small child and the constant thump and rhythm of the incredible mechanisms were hypnotic. Because my Grandma lived in Glasgow, I didn't see her as often as I would have liked so days out like this were very special - and the Waverley always conjured up fond memories for me. So I was keen to see her return to service after a four-year-long absence, during which extensive work was done to make her seaworthy.   Sadly, my Grandma died last year and was unable to accompany me.   Skye is home to many boat tours, many of which are aimed at tourists and visitors.  The Waverley felt a little bit different.   Most of the people I spoke to were Scottish.  Many of them had friends or knew people who had worked on or even helped build her.  All of us felt connected with a shared love of the vessel, her incredible history and our own heritage.   I was struck by the idea that generations could enjoy her - grandparents, grandchildren and then the grandchildren's grandchildren!   I wanted to include my grandmother somehow, so I photographed a photograph.  Sadly, I didn't have any pictures to hand of the trip we all took on the Wavelery (and how I wished I'd taken more photographs!) but I had a lovely one of both my grandparents together, with the incredible engine room forming the backdrop. Welcome back, Waverley!
In which I test AI copywriting

In which I test AI copywriting

I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   It's worth noting that my current bio line in LinkedIn is: "Freelance senior copywriter. I work with agencies to create copy that gets results. Fuelled by Earl Grey tea and chocolate." Here's what CopyAI came up with: "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." To make it a fair test, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   It's worth noting that my current bio line in LinkedIn is: "Freelance senior copywriter. I work with agencies to create copy that gets results. Fuelled by Earl Grey tea and chocolate." Here's what CopyAI came up with: "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   It's worth noting that my current bio line in LinkedIn is: "Freelance senior copywriter. I work with agencies to create copy that gets results. Fuelled by Earl Grey tea and chocolate." Here's what CopyAI came up with: "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption CopyAI didn't do too well here, with heavy reliance on emojis, stating the obvious and simply not making any sense at all. AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: "<Name>, meet the [car name].  It's going to take your breath away." I thought that was a bit cliche so I also came up with: I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption CopyAI didn't do too well here, with heavy reliance on emojis, stating the obvious and simply not making any sense at all. AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: "<Name>, meet the [car name].  It's going to take your breath away." I thought that was a bit cliche so I also came up with: "The new [car name] can do 0-60 in [insert ludicrously impressive time here]. But you'll love the drive so much, you'll take the long way home." Better.   Let's see what the AI came up with. First of all, where does Nike come into it?  And honey?  Does AI know what a supercar is?  Although, I must admit, the $1 would be an interesting name for a supercar.   The conclusion I will preface my conclusion by saying I only used CopyAI (many of the others wanted me to create an account or sign up, so it was the easiest option) and I only used the free features.  I would imagine the paid-for versions offer either better quality or more options. I was pleasantly surprised by how well AI did in some instances, especially as I deliberately gave it very little to work with.  It doesn't have an imagination to fill in the gaps, so it did extremely well, especially with the bio options.   However, I don't believe an AI could truly replace the human ability to create playful, on-brand copy.  It cannot comprehend all the nuances and, in some cases, it makes no sense whatsoever.  What AI can consistently do is create inspiration - for the human writers. I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption CopyAI didn't do too well here, with heavy reliance on emojis, stating the obvious and simply not making any sense at all. AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: "<Name>, meet the [car name].  It's going to take your breath away." I thought that was a bit cliche so I also came up with: "The new [car name] can do 0-60 in [insert ludicrously impressive time here]. But you'll love the drive so much, you'll take the long way home." Better.   Let's see what the AI came up with. First of all, where does Nike come into it?  And honey?  Does AI know what a supercar is?  Although, I must admit, the $1 would be an interesting name for a supercar.   The conclusion I will preface my conclusion by saying I only used CopyAI (many of the others wanted me to create an account or sign up, so it was the easiest option) and I only used the free features.  I would imagine the paid-for versions offer either better quality or more options. I was pleasantly surprised by how well AI did in some instances, especially as I deliberately gave it very little to work with.  It doesn't have an imagination to fill in the gaps, so it did extremely well, especially with the bio options.   However, I don't believe an AI could truly replace the human ability to create playful, on-brand copy.  It cannot comprehend all the nuances and, in some cases, it makes no sense whatsoever.  What AI can consistently do is create inspiration - for the human writers. I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption CopyAI didn't do too well here, with heavy reliance on emojis, stating the obvious and simply not making any sense at all. AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: "<Name>, meet the [car name].  It's going to take your breath away." I thought that was a bit cliche so I also came up with: "The new [car name] can do 0-60 in [insert ludicrously impressive time here]. But you'll love the drive so much, you'll take the long way home." Better.   Let's see what the AI came up with. First of all, where does Nike come into it?  And honey?  Does AI know what a supercar is?  Although, I must admit, the $1 would be an interesting name for a supercar.   The conclusion I will preface my conclusion by saying I only used CopyAI (many of the others wanted me to create an account or sign up, so it was the easiest option) and I only used the free features.  I would imagine the paid-for versions offer either better quality or more options. I was pleasantly surprised by how well AI did in some instances, especially as I deliberately gave it very little to work with.  It doesn't have an imagination to fill in the gaps, so it did extremely well, especially with the bio options.   However, I don't believe an AI could truly replace the human ability to create playful, on-brand copy.  It cannot comprehend all the nuances and, in some cases, it makes no sense whatsoever.  What AI can consistently do is create inspiration - for the human writers. I saw a post on LinkedIn recently about the latest hot topic - Elon Musk's decision to end remote working at Tesla. The poster also commented on the growing reliance of AI to do certain jobs - which got me thinking: could I one day find myself replaced by Artificial Intelligence?  Could a robot come up with better copy than a human? Well, let's see. I went with CopyAI.  It has a pretty comprehensive free plan, which made it perfect for our test today. AI writes a bio I gave CopyAI a few prompts and then waited to see what it came up with.   "New York Times bestselling author, copywriting advisor to fortune 500 and billion dollar startups. I teach copywriters how to make a living." I'm not sure where it got the idea that I was a New York Times bestselling author - and that's the most plausible part of that whole bio. "I am a copywriter, which means I write words. I am a freelance writer, which means I write words for money. I am a copywriter and freelance writer, which means I write words for money better than anyone else (hopefully)." I quite liked the playful tone of this one and it's definitely got potential. "If you're a content creator (marketer or writer) this is the place to get started. It's not a secret society where I have to reach a certain number of followers before I'll share my secrets with you. That's what my coaching" It simply gave up after coaching.   "Boring Me About Your Product? I'll Write Your Product Copy to Get Your Customers' Attention and Target a Demographic They Can't Resist." Unlike the other versions, this one featured capitals.  I'm not sure why.  I'm also not sure it's a good idea to call potential clients' products "boring." AI writes an Instagram caption CopyAI didn't do too well here, with heavy reliance on emojis, stating the obvious and simply not making any sense at all. AI writes an email subject line As I frequently write email subject lines for work, I decided to myself the same challenge as I gave the AI.   Here's my version: "<Name>, meet the [car name].  It's going to take your breath away." I thought that was a bit cliche so I also came up with: "The new [car name] can do 0-60 in [insert ludicrously impressive time here]. But you'll love the drive so much, you'll take the long way home." Better.   Let's see what the AI came up with. First of all, where does Nike come into it?  And honey?  Does AI know what a supercar is?  Although, I must admit, the $1 would be an interesting name for a supercar.   The conclusion I will preface my conclusion by saying I only used CopyAI (many of the others wanted me to create an account or sign up, so it was the easiest option) and I only used the free features.  I would imagine the paid-for versions offer either better quality or more options. I was pleasantly surprised by how well AI did in some instances, especially as I deliberately gave it very little to work with.  It doesn't have an imagination to fill in the gaps, so it did extremely well, especially with the bio options.   However, I don't believe an AI could truly replace the human ability to create playful, on-brand copy.  It cannot comprehend all the nuances and, in some cases, it makes no sense whatsoever.  What AI can consistently do is create inspiration - for the human writers.
Why freelance copywriting isn't my "side hustle"

Why freelance copywriting isn't my "side hustle"

"You always want to improve," he said.  "Am I right?" I confirmed that he was right.  He proceeded to take time out of his own workday to talk me through ways I could improve my copywriting, giving constructive feedback and ways to make my writing better. I've seen numerous posts on LinkedIn describing copywriting as a profitable side hustle - and for many people that may be exactly what it is.  But, for me, it's something of an art form.   Warning: ranting ahead. I've seen numerous posts on LinkedIn describing copywriting as a profitable "side hustle" - and this rubs me up the wrong way. What's a side hustle? The Cambridge Dictionary definition above is pretty straightforward.   Is there anything wrong with starting a copywriting business while you do other work?  Absolutely not.  I started my business while I was working full-time in a pizzeria, often scribbling business ideas on the backs of old orders.   But the idea of copywriting being reduced to something that never develops into anything further than a side gig doesn't sit well with me.  Here's why copywriting isn't my side hustle. Excellence takes time While I fully appreciate most people don't have the luxury of leaving their current employment and immediately launching a copywriting business, in order to be an excellent copywriter, you need to devote time to your craft.  That's extremely hard when you're juggling a job and likely have other commitments.   Running a copywriting business is time-consuming The day-to-day running of a copywriting business includes all sorts of activities, including: Emailing Networking Answering the phone Cold pitching to your dream clients Attending meetings Keeping your social media updated Keeping your blog updated Keeping your portfolio updated Keeping your CV updated Keeping your accounts updated Actually writing Sharpening your skills (learning, classes, practicing, etc.) I know that, in order to give each of those tasks the attention it deserves, I need to allocate the correct amount of time for each one - and often I fail miserably.  Add to this all the tasks you need to do in your personal life (housework, family time, walking the dog, exercising, etc.) and the idea of having another job in addition to all this would make me want to crawl in a dark hole. Clients deserve the best I'm fairly expensive and I want to make sure I'm worth what I charge.  For me, that involves giving each client my full attention.  If copywriting was my side hustle, shoehorned into my evenings or lunch breaks, I know my writing would suffer and the clients' experience would be poor.  Clients often comment on my fast response times and how quickly I'm able to action amends.  This is because I have the luxury of allocating time in order to do this, in order to make them my priority.  None of this is intended to be discouraging to anyone thinking about making copywriting their career or even dabbling in it to see if it's a good fit.  I simply feel describing copywriting as a "side hustle" doesn't give this incredibly rewarding career the respect it deserves.